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The topic of the Tom Nairn Lecture 2009 is ‘Global Rebellion: Religious Challenges to the Secular State’ and is presented by Professor Mark Juergensmeyer from the University of California.

Saki Sugiura discusses her 35 day practicum with the RMIT student union. Saki is an international student studying the Bachelor Social Science (Youth Work) degree. Students complete 35 day placements in youth sector settings during the three year degree. Saki describes what it is like being an international student learning about youth work at RMIT and what she experienced and learnt on placement. Saki offers practical advice for international students thinking about studying youth work at RMIT.

Crystal Cullen and Carolyn Hughes discuss their 35 day practicum working with young people and their families affected by the Black Saturday bushfires. Crystal and Carolyn are studying the Bachelor Social Science (Youth Work) degree. Students complete 35 day placements in youth sector settings during the three year degree. Crystal and Carolyn describes what their project ‘Burnt Out – Stories from the Ashes’, where they skilled young people to film, edit and publish stories from bush fire survivors. Crystal and Carolyn share what they learnt about good youth work practice.

Celeste Dolphin discusses her 35 day practicum with the South-East Local Learning and Employment Network (SELLEN). Celeste is studying the Bachelor Social Science (Youth Work) degree. Students complete 35 day placements in youth sector settings during the three year degree. Celeste describes the research project she was responsible for while on placement, and what she learnt from the practical experience. Celeste shares her wisdom on getting the most from youth work field education.

Daniel Dondo discusses his 35 day practicums with the Office for Youth and the International Student Services at RMIT Student Union. Daniel is studying the Bachelor Social Science (Youth Work) degree. Students complete 35 day placements in youth sector settings during the three year degree. Daniel describes how the two placements gave him very different tastes of youth work and what he learnt from the practical experiences. Daniel provides advice to students on getting the most out of your youth sector placement.

What does it mean to opt-out of citizenship? Reflecting on the inter-war refugee crisis, Hannah Arendt theorised statelessness or the lack of national citizenship as the loss of the right to have rights and the ultimate state of dehumanisation. More recently, Georgio Agamben has theorised the refugee as the figure of homo sacer, reduced to bare life (existence without political status) through the excesses of sovereign power.

In a recent book Professors Joseph Camilleri and Jim Falk set out to investigate how the capacity of humans to shape their future - and in particular through the processes which collectively have become known as public governance - are, could, and perhaps even should evolve during this period of extraordinary transition which humans and their planet are experiencing. Inevitably such a goal could be only partially realised.

The 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol establish important criteria and guidelines for providing protection for individuals experiencing persecution. Yet since its inception, the Convention has been criticised on a number of levels. Recent criticism has focused particularly on the narrow scope of the Convention definition of who qualifies as a refugee, particularly in light of changing global circumstances that are driving more and more people to flee their country of origin for reasons other than individual persecution.

Cosmopolitanism in the Multipolar World
Professor David Held delivered the 2012 Globalism Research Centre Tom Nairn Lecture on March 27, 2012.

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A talk given by Bob Isherwood, Worldwide Creative Director of Saatchi & Saatchi and RMIT alumnus.

A talk given by Josh Lancaster on working in advertising in New Zealand and Australia.

A showcase of life at RMIT University, the courses on offer, facilities and student work. Students discuss their experiences at RMIT and career options.

Adam Bandt, federal member for Melbourne, gives the opening address at the Making A Small World Smaller forum.

The forum was hosted by RMIT and the State Library of Victoria and aimed to build on a proposal for a new centre at the Library that will combine social enterprise, community development and social media to increase Victoria’s intellectual and social capital.

Professor Brian Corbitt, Deputy Pro Vice Chancellor of Research and Innovation at RMIT University, speaks at the Making A Small World Smaller forum.

The forum was hosted by RMIT and the State Library of Victoria and aimed to build on a proposal for a new centre at the Library that will combine social enterprise, community development and social media to increase Victoria’s intellectual and social capital.

Peter Williams, CEO of Deloitte Digital, speaks at the Making a Small World Smaller forum.

The forum was hosted by RMIT and the State Library of Victoria and aimed to build on a proposal for a new centre at the Library that will combine social enterprise, community development and social media to increase Victoria’s intellectual and social capital.

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This interview with psychoanalyst and philosopher Adam Phillips, co-author of ‘On Kindness’, was filmed in London July 2009 with Stephen Feneley as part of the exhibition Shelter: On Kindness, RMIT Gallery, Melbourne.

This interview with psychoanalyst and philosopher Adam Phillips, co-author of ‘On Kindness’, was filmed in London July 2009 with Stephen Feneley as part of the exhibition Shelter: On Kindness, RMIT Gallery, Melbourne.

Cosmopolitanism in the Multipolar World
Professor David Held delivered the 2012 Globalism Research Centre Tom Nairn Lecture on March 27, 2012.

French

It has been shown that French speakers display a “high-involvement style” in interaction, with frequent use of interruptions, overlaps and disagreements. This presentation by Dr Kerry Mullan (coordinator of the French Program at RMIT University) examines this style, and draws comparisons with the interactional style of Australian English.

Fiction

After winning the 2012 Victorian Premier's Unpublished Manuscript Award for his book, The Rosie Project, author Graeme Simsion hasn't looked back. The graduate of both the RMIT Diploma of Professional Writing and Editing and the RMIT Advanced Diploma of Screenwriting has since gone on to see his book published by Text Publishing and now sold in 40 countries.

*Science*

SETUP Interviews - Colin Arrowsmith

A series of interviews introducing course offerings from the arena of Science, Engineering and Technology. This interview features Dr Asha Rao, program leader in Information Security and Assurance in the School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, which are usually maintained in culture. Pure cultures of microbes are crucial to the success of studies in this area. Good, repeatable results must rely on good aseptic technique being used at all times, and on the correct use of related techniques.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, which are usually maintained in culture. Pure cultures of microbes are crucial to the success of studies in this area. Good, repeatable results must rely on good aseptic technique being used at all times, and on the correct use of related techniques.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, which are usually maintained in culture. Pure cultures of microbes are crucial to the success of studies in this area. Good, repeatable results must rely on good aseptic technique being used at all times, and on the correct use of related techniques.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, which are usually maintained in culture. Pure cultures of microbes are crucial to the success of studies in this area. Good, repeatable results must rely on good aseptic technique being used at all times, and on the correct use of related techniques.

Microbiology is the study of microscopic organisms, which are usually maintained in culture. Pure cultures of microbes are crucial to the success of studies in this area. Good, repeatable results must rely on good aseptic technique being used at all times, and on the correct use of related techniques.

Blastwaves and malaria-infected blood cells are just some of the amazing images shown at the exhibition - stretch your mind and your perceptions to look into micro worlds.
Curated and managed by the Australian Museum, this exhibition at RMIT Gallery showcased the best twenty-five entries in the annual Eureka Prize for Science Photography, sponsored by New Scientist.
The Prize is awarded for a single photograph that most effectively communicates an aspect of science, and is a significant component of the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, Australia’s premier science awards.

On Talking Technology this week, Garry Barker talks to James Cuda, chief executive of an innovative company in Hobart, called Savage Interactive that makes what is regarded by many artists as one of the best painting applications on the global market.
Following that, he and regular co-host Leon Gettler discuss the latest and greatest in the world of technology.

This week on Talking Technology, Garry Barker speaks to one of the leading thinkers in mobile technologies Josh Clark, who runs 'Global Moxie', a hypertext laboratory with multimedia studios in Providence, Rhode Island and Paris. Josh is a designer, an author and a developer and talks about the philosophy of App development and how this mobile communication revolution is changing the lifestyles of millions around the world.

Following this, Garry and regular co-host Leon Gettler discuss the latest news in the world of technology today.

On this week's Talking Technology podcast, Dr Laurie Sparke, chief technology officer of the electric car company 'EDay Life' (http://www.edaylife.com.au), speaks about the release of EDay Life's first models to be introduced in Australia early 2012, and the future developments in batteries and electric powered transport.

Mikkel Svane is the CEO and founder of ZenDesk (http://www.zendesk.com), a Danish software company that recently moved to San Francisco, raised $25 million from investors and set about becoming a global leader in call centre technology. Mikkel talks to Garry Baker and Leon Gettler about the challenges of making a call centre a good experience not only for the caller but also the centre's agents. The name and the company's laughing Buddha give's a clue to its aims – to produce a happy outcome good for all.

Dr Mehdi Khaled is the vice-president of the Oracle Corporation for Healthcare and Life Sciences, covering Asia Pacific and Japan. He is a medical doctor but also holds degrees in IT and software engineering. He was in Melbourne recently to attend the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society conference.

Garry Barker and Leo Gettler talk to Shawn Smith, founder and chief executive of Hypnotic Zoo, a web design company based in Point Cook. Shawn deals mostly with small to medium businesses that are in most cases making their first forays into the online world. He talks about the technology he uses and the challenges, for his customers and his team, in bringing in a successful result. Followed by Garry and Leo’s regular roundup of the weeks’ tech news.

Garry and Leon talk to Wes Ward from Australian website marketing.com.au which guides businesses into the increasingly important world of online commerce, implementing cost efficient strategies for Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) and web design.

Daryl Wright is managing director of Vantage Performance, a company specialising in breathing new life into companies. He talks about his work in Australia, the challenges of what he describes as the Australian business culture and the need to understand that Australian companies are well positioned to effectively compete and succeed in both the local and the global market.
Followed by Garry and Leon’s roundup of this week’s technology news in 'Tech Talk'.

Dr Tamara Davis, PhD is a young Queensland astrophysicist who, with a team rejoicing in the name of the WiggleZs, have found evidence that dark energy is real, a discovery that supports Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. About 23 per cent of the Universe is dark matter. The rest is thought to be dark energy, about which we know very little.

Marcus Weldon is the chief technology officer of Alcatel Lucent, the largest networking company in the world and a firm that is now closely interested in environmental protection and in producing technology that saves energy and reduces pollution in the world. He talks about that aspect of the modern IT industry and where it is going.

Dr Steve Hodgkinson is the research director in Australia for Ovum, the independent IT research and industry analyst company. He talks to Leon and Garry about cloud computing, its future place in the enterprise and what it will contribute to small to medium business.

Jan Bouwen is head of visual communications for Bell Labs, one of the most prestigious research institutions in the world. Here he talks about the future of visual communication and Bell's own research into 'immersion' technology which will redefine video communication, whether it be for video conferencing or dating.

Jason Sew Hoy is chief operating officer of a Melbourne company called '99designs' that operates on the internet acting as a kind of booking agency for graphic designers all over the world. Their clients are mostly small businesses seeking professionally designed logos, websites and other items they need in their business. Following that, Garry and Leon wrap up this week's news with another insightful discussion about the latest in the world of technology.

In this week's episode of Talking Technology, Garry Barker and Leon Gettler speak to serial entrepreneur, investor and doctor Adir Shiffman. Adir is the founder of online shopping website StartHere.com.au, and he speaks in detail about the technology he developed to manage and track customers purchases and calculate refunds that buyers earn with every purchase using the free Start Here online shopping service.

Following this interview, your regular weekly news update of information technology around the world is presented by Garry Barker and Leon Gettler.

Todd Sizer is Head of Wireless Research at Bell Laboratories which is a division of Alcatel Lucent, one of the largest networking companies in the world. Here he talks about the future of wireless technology and the kind of technology being developed to cope with the explosion in data demand that has been created by smart phones. Look out for the cube!

For centuries, astronomers have built increasingly powerful telescopes designed to look at small parts of the sky. However, there are fundamental questions about the Cosmos that can’t be answered through this approach. An exciting new Australian initiative is now aiming to crack the big questions in astronomy, by looking at the whole sky at once.

Professor Bryan Gaensler will explore if looking at the sky differently can answer questions about the Cosmos.

How is today's modern technology driven lifestyle enabled by plasma technology?

Dr André Anders will discuss the science of plasmas and how they have been used in practical applications over the past 250 years. He will explore the newer developments of the last decades including the use of plasmas for the preparation of thin films and coatings that enable much of the high-tech lifestyle we enjoy today.

PROFESSOR MIN GU OF SWINBURNE UNIVERSITY IN VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA DESCRIBES THE LATEST ADVANCES IN SOLAR TECHNOLOGY.

Get involved at RMIT http://www.rmit.edu.au/students/getinvolved

Smruti, originally from Madras, India, talks about how she got involved at RMIT mentoring primary school students through In2Science, showing them how exciting science can be.

Scott Watkins leads CSIRO's research team on Organic Photovoltaics. They are developing technology to replace high-cost silicon based solar cells with low-cost, environmentally friendly, printable, thin-film, plastic solar cells that can printed on to clothing and roofs.

Jurgen Michaelis, CEO of BioSciences SA talks about the work of developing innovation, science and technology in South Australia

Relevant links: http://www.sabiosciences.com/

Agriculture

Astronomy

The RMIT Satellite Positioning for Atmosphere, Climate and Environment (SPACE) Research Centre focuses on the development of Platform Technologies for space, atmosphere and climate.

Research is conducted in the context of new generation global navigation and geo-environmental satellite systems, to support a wide range of applications. It is expected that this research will play a significant role for the planning, design, launch and operation of any future Australian micro/nano-satellite missions.

Interview with Lachlan Thompson, associate professor of Aerospace Design, RMIT

How is new knowledge impacting the creative imaginations of today? This conversation will take you into the Big Bang depths and back again.

RMIT Associate professor Lawrence Harvey speaks with German artist Abel Korinsky and American astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack about dark matter, black holes and how new research and finding may change our lives in the future. A new work by Korinsky is included in the upcoming Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.

Biology

We currently face a biodiversity and extinction crisis as human population pressure and climate change combine to push our natural environments to the limit. Professor Ary Hoffmann wonders if rapid evolution can come to the rescue. In this Transforming the Future public lecture, Professor Hoffman asks, ‘Can evolution help species to keep up, particularly if we help it along?’

We currently face a biodiversity and extinction crisis as human population pressure and climate change combine to push our natural environments to the limit. Professor Ary Hoffmann wonders if rapid evolution can come to the rescue. In this Transforming the Future public lecture, Professor Hoffman asks, ‘Can evolution help species to keep up, particularly if we help it along?’

RMIT Associate Professor Vipul Bansal is heading up the new Ian Potter NanoBioSensing Facility at RMIT.

The $1.25 million research facility is supporting the development of rapid detection nanodevices, which can cut the diagnosis time of potentially life threatening diseases and health hazards.

Chemistry

Flow analysis requires a specific equipment kit, which is demonstrated.

Environment

Since 2001, RMIT has sent a team of students to Vietnam to research environmental issues. In 2012, students looked at water management issues in Ho Chi Minh City.

Part 2 looks at the outcome of the project through the eyes of the students after their return to Melbourne. For more on the Vietnam Project visit http://www.rmit.edu.au/appliedsciences/vietnam

A critical and jovial debate to honour one of Australia’s foremost transport advocates and planning scholars, Dr Paul Mees OAM.

Master of Ceremonies: John Faine, radio presenter and host with ABC
774 Melbourne.

Debaters:
Senator Janet Rice, Australian Greens, former Mayor of Maribyrnong and co-founder and former Chair of the Metropolitan Transport Forum.

Mr Rod Quantock, Melbourne comedian and self-professed ‘failed architect’

Councillor Jackie Fristacky, Mayor of City Yarra Council

Associate Professor Wendy Steele, Principal Research Fellow at RMIT University

Featuring Prof. Manfred B. Steger, A/Prof. Chris Hudson, A/Prof James Goodman and Prof. Supriya Singh.

As urban sprawl expands across the globe, planners and ecologists must come together to promote innovative approaches to conservation. Associate Professor Sarah Bekessy discusses the importance of incorporating natural habitats within cities to support wildlife conservation and improve human health and well-being. She will also showcase her work in biodiversity and how her research is helping to re-imagine cities.

A panel of RMIT’s Sustainability and Urban Planning experts discuss responses to climate change and the greening of Melbourne.

Speakers draw upon case studies from across the globe where people are preparing their environment to better withstand the inevitable impacts of climate change.

*Psychology and Social Science*

A series of interviews with graduates and current students about their job, how they got there, what they learned in the course, and how they have been able to apply those skills and the knowledge in their career. These videos provide new and prospective students with information about career paths, industry practices, insight and advice.

A series of interviews with graduates and current students about their job, how they got there, what they learned in the course, and how they have been able to apply those skills and the knowledge in their career. These videos provide new and prospective students with information about career paths, industry practices, insight and advice.

A series of interviews with graduates and current students about their job, how they got there, what they learned in the course, and how they have been able to apply those skills and the knowledge in their career. These videos provide new and prospective students with information about career paths, industry practices, insight and advice.

A series of interviews with graduates and current students about their job, how they got there, what they learned in the course, and how they have been able to apply those skills and the knowledge in their career. These videos provide new and prospective students with information about career paths, industry practices, insight and advice.

A series of interviews with graduates and current students about their job, how they got there, what they learned in the course, and how they have been able to apply those skills and the knowledge in their career. These videos provide new and prospective students with information about career paths, industry practices, insight and advice.

Why has it taken so long for women in Australia to achieve paid maternity
leave – and what happens next?

Opening remarks: Statement by Japanese for Peace
Kandori Shizuka
Japanese for Peace.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Kandori Shizuka talks about her inspiration to join Japanese for Peace, her experience in teaching students in Australia about Hiroshima and Nagasaki and her own understanding of the events of World War II.

The present moment in the task of abolishing nuclear weapons.
Keynote Speaker: Ambassador Rolf Ekéus
Chair, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Nuclear weapons are becoming increasingly ineffective as a deterrence.

The challenge of getting to zero: The role of the Australia-Japan International Commission in Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament
Keynote Speaker: Professor Gareth Evans
Co-chair, International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Disarmament requires a broad constituency, including Russia and the USA.

New climate science and the urgency of zero
Speaker: Tilman Ruff
Australian NGO advisor - International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Challenging the myth that we need nuclear weapons
Speaker: Marianne Hanson
Reader in International Relations, University of Queensland

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

The possession of nuclear weapons does not make a state secure.

Why are nuclear weapons so persistent?
Speaker: Patrick Morgan
Tierney Chair, Peace & Conflict Studies, University of California, Irvine

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

What is to be done? By whom? When? And How?
Speaker: Joseph Camilleri
Director, Centre for Dialogue, La Trobe University.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Why has it taken so long for women in Australia to achieve paid maternity
leave – and what happens next?

New developments in Nuclear Weapon-Free Zones
Speaker: Michael Hamel-Green
Executive Dean, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, Victoria University.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Towards an arc of disarmament: the Australia-Japan connection and post-nuclear security
Speaker: Tessa Morris-Suzuki
Professor of Japanese History, Australian National University.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

It is important to look at the images of Hiroshima to remind ourselves that this is what nuclear weapons are for, this is what they do.

Can Japan change? New government, civil society and the region
Speaker: Kawasaki Akira
Japanese NGO advisor - International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

New dynamics: nuclear relations in Northeast Asia
Speaker: Jimbo Ken
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Policy Management, Keio University.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

A global abolition treaty: getting us to zero
Speaker: Dimity Hawkins
International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ican).

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Fuelling uncertainty: Uranium and Australia's nuclear landscape
Speaker: Dave Sweeney
Australian Conservation Foundation.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Our mines have a history of leaks, spills, breaches, accidents and incidents.

The nuclear fuel cycle and Australia's energy future
Speaker: Hugh Saddler
Managing Director, Energy Strategies.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Nuclear power makes no sense in Australia.

Transnational linkages for peace
Speaker: Yi Kiho
Director, Nautilus Institute ARI, Seoul.

Who will stop nuclear next use? A public forum on nuclear disarmament organised by the Australia-Japan Civil Society Cooperation for Nuclear Disarmament, Nautilus Institute.

Transnational civil society is important for North East Asian security.

Dr danah boyd Podcast chapters:

0:00 - Dr Heather Horst introduces the lecture series

1:16 - CCI Director Professor Stuart Cunningham introduces the lecture and explains the link between CCI and RMIT University's School of Media and Communication - http://cci.edu.au/profile/stuart-cunningham

3:46 - Dr Heather Horst introduces Dr danah boyd
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heather_Horst

7:08 - Dr danah boyd lecture - "Privacy in Networked Publics"
http://www.danah.org/

47:09 - Questions and Answers
(Some questions unfortunately were not recorded)

Interview with Lee Hawksley, Managing Director at ExactTarget, a global company specialising in cross-channel interactive marketing and Software As A Service solutions across email, mobile, social media and websites.

Everyday Misogyny and the Cultural Scaffolding of Rape
Associate Professor Nicola Gavey, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Image by Newtown Graffiti

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Rob Hulls was educated in Melbourne and undertook his law studies at RMIT. From 1984 to 1986 he was a solicitor at the then Legal Aid Commission working in the Glenroy and Frankston offices.

From 1990 to 1993, Mr Hulls was the Federal Member for Kennedy, an electorate covering 770000 kilometres and described as the most diverse electorate in Australia, a seat now held by Bob Katter.

The Honourable Michael Kirby, AC, CMG, former Justice of the High Court of Australia (1996-2009), reveals the inner workings of the High Court.

Social Welfare

Professor Charlotte Williams OBE, Discipline Head of Social Work at RMIT, celebrates 40 years of social work education at RMIT University, reflecting on memories and exploring the challenges facing the profession in the future.

A guest lecture is then presented by Paris Aristotle AM, Director of Victorian Foundation for Survivors of Torture and Chair of the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship’s Council on Asylum Seekers and Detention (MCASD): ‘The good, the bad and the ugly’: responding to the challenges of forced migration in the 21st century

Increasingly, scholars, practitioners, activists and government bodies are turning to indicators, algorithms and other statistical tools in order to construct knowledge about the highly complex problem of gendered violence. Quantification can help to foster public awareness, prompt political, legal and social action, validate the experiences of victims, and ensure accountability at the individual, organisational and state levels. Yet what are the implications of this “quantitative turn” for addressing and preventing the problem of gendered violence?

Sociology

This seminar explores the research findings recently published in the book Social Relations and the Cuban Health Miracle (Transaction, April 2010). Adopting a theoretical framework based on findings in recent ‘state capacity’ and ‘social capital’ literatures, the book explores the puzzle of Cuba’s key national health indicators, which are extremely positive for the country’s region and developing status, and given the arduous external circumstances it has faced in recent decades.

This paper offers a theoretical framework for understanding how foreign policy affects its own domestic sphere. Inverting the traditional analysis of foreign relations, it will be argued that there is a significant impact from external foreign policy on 'domestic' individual subjectivity and social order. As such, this framework demonstrates how the subjectivity of citizens are shaped by notions of security stemming from the pervasion of norms and stereotypes of foreign policy that rebound onto domestic politics.

It was argued in this presentation that Japan's child pornography problems occur within the context of a state that permits the organisation of women and girls for pornography consumption in order to bolster its political viability. The economic malaise that has beset Japan since the 1990s has caused the increasing destabilisation of its male workforce, but this threat to the state remains placated as long as the sexual 'comfort' on offer to Japanese men continues to progress in its diversity and extremity.

What role do constitutional rules play in solving multiple questions regarding succession, especially in the context of regimes with charismatic, personalistic leaders? What would happen if a president is ill, and may no longer fulfill her duties? These are important questions for developing democracies, as recently demonstrated in the case of the diagnosis and treatment of cancer of Venezuela's president Hugo Chávez, who is standing for reelection on October 7, 2012.

Global Frictions: A Seminar Series hosted by the Centre for Global Research
Presents
Rethinking Resilience: Policy and Practice in the Context of Global Development

Featuring:
• Associate Professor Robbie Guevara, RMIT University
• Dr Anne Brown, University of Queensland
• Annette Salkeld, Oxfam Australia
• Dr Damian Grenfell, RMIT University (Convener of Discussion)

Abstract:

Seeking Approval - A Question of Power, Gender or Culture

Featuring Dr Elizabeth Gower, Dr Leslie Cannold, Sushi Das and Dr Meagan Tyler

a public program event for the exhibition

Elizabeth Gower - he loves me, he loves me not

RMIT Gallery 11 March - 23 April 2016

This Global Frictions panel discussion grapples with vexed issues at the intersection of language and tradition when dealing with family violence in linguistically diverse communities. The panel discussion features Dr Eliseu Mabasso (University Eduardo Mondlane, Mozambique) and Dr Adele Murdolo (Executive Director, Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health). The discussion is moderated by Dr Georgina Heydon (RMIT).

For decades the emigration of highly skilled residents has been a cause of concern for many governments. Initially this was cast as a ‘brain drain’, but after several countries experienced significant return migration flows, the notion of ‘brain circulation’ took hold. More recently governments, corporations and various types of institutions have come to understand highly skilled expatriates as constituting diasporic communities, and have sought to engage strategically with them to achieve a range of political and economic objectives.

Culture is increasingly recognised as the fourth pillar of sustainable development in the ‘developed world’, with international peak bodies such as United Cities and Local Government (UCLG) identifying culture as a policy domain that governments should consider and support. A Committee for Culture was recently established by UCLG in the Asia-Pacific region, indicating a likely relevance to Asian and Pacific nations including many considered as ‘developing’.