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Ian Woodruff and Rod McCrohan presentation on The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the Leadership and Management program BUSM 3120. Date:15.12.2010

The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the RMIT Leadership and Management course BUSM 3120

Ian Woodruff and Rod McCrohan presentation on The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the Leadership and Management program BUSM 3120. Date:15.12.2010

Ian Woodruff and Rod McCrohan presentation on The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the Leadership and Management program BUSM 3120. Date:15.12.2010

Ian Woodruff and Rod McCrohan presentation on The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the Leadership and Management program BUSM 3120. Date:15.12.2010

Ian Woodruff and Rod McCrohan presentation on The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the Leadership and Management program BUSM 3120. Date:15.12.2010

Ian Woodruff and Rod McCrohan presentation on The 1:1:1 Delivery model as trialled in the Leadership and Management program BUSM 3120. Date:15.12.2010

Garry and Leon talk to Arek Sinanian of Parsons Brinckerhoff, one of the world’s leading planning, environment and infrastructure firms.

Leon and Garry talk to RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson about the flood levy, lower inflation and the future of RBA board member Warwick McKibbin.

Leon and Garry talk about the impact of the floods driving down Australia’s GDP and hitting the agriculture, transport & logistics and mining sectors. Tourism will also take a short term hit as will insurance. The floods have already affected Australian companies like Woolworths and Virgin Blue which have come out with profit warnings. Meanwhile, Coles has beaten Woolworths for a sixth consecutive quarter on comparable store sales. The Government’s flood levy will see a two tiered scheme that will generate $1.8 billion.

Garry and Leon talk to Andrew Goretski, managing director of Retail Directions, a provider of software solutions to retail businesses.

Garry and Leon talk to RMIT economist Alberto Posso about the latest employment figures.

Leon and Garry talk about how the November interest rate hike helped create a record $3.35 billion profit for the Commonwealth Bank. NAB’s earnings for the quarter are up 18% to $1.3 billion. Macquarie downgrades its full year profit guidance but Rio Tinto records a massive 122% jump in annual earnings to $US14 billion and flags share buybacks. It also expands operations in Canada and Australia. Oz Minerals announces a $586.9 million profit, turning around from last year’s loss. Alumina has also returned to profit to $US35 million, a turnaround from last year’s loss.

Garry and Leon talk to Paul Ramsbottom, managing director of Advanced Solutions International, a global provider of web-based software for member and donor-based non-profits.

Garry and Leon talk to RMIT economist Jonathon Boymal about the latest cost of living figures.

Leon and Garry talk about this week’s profit announcements with BHP Billiton announcing a 71.5% jump in its profit to more than $10 billion. Westfield has posted its first annual profit since 2007, reporting $1.1 billion net profit. Coles has helped drive a 33% increase in half year profit for Wesfarmers to $1.17 billion. Westpac announces a small fall in its first quarter earnings but Bendigo and Adelaide Bank posts a 67.1% lift in its half year profit to $173.9 million. Dominos Pizza profits are up nearly 17% to $10.2 million, AMP reports a 5% increase in its profits.

This week Leon and Garry talk to the CEO of Freelancer.com, Matt Barry

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about what’s been described as Australia’s “bipolar economy” with the mining sector booming but other sectors like retail and manufacturing struggling.

Leon and Garry talk about the government’s announcement of a carbon price from 2012 and what it means for business. They look at the big profits for Caltex, Amcor, Austar, Southern Cross, AGL, Coca Cola-Amatil, Sensis, Flight Centre, Asciano, Fairfax Media and Toll Holdings. But losses for Bluescope Steel, Mirvac, Origin and Pacific Brands on top of falls in profit for OneSteel, Fantastic Holdings, Sonic Healthcare, Suncorp, Virgin Blue, IAG and Perpetual. Centro says it does not know whether it can continue as a going concern and the latest NAB survey shows business confidence falling.

Garry and Leon talk to Sara Gipton, CEO of leading environmental charity Greenfleet

RMIT economist Alberto Posso talks about the latest trade figures with reduced imports of oils and lower coal sales to India and China.

Garry and Leon talk about how the carbon wars have begun with Tony Abbott turning the prospective carbon price into an election issue. Business is all for scrapping the price but wants certainty. BlueScope Steel managing director Paul O’Malley has written to Prime Minister Julia Gillard saying manufacturing should be exempted, the horse trading has begun. Computers seem to be melting down everywhere: at the ASX, Commonwealth Bank with its ATMs spitting out free money and Westpac.

Director of online business at Deloitte Consulting Frank Farrell talks about the use of tablets by business executives and the growth of technology in business.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the latest unemployment figures, the milk wars and the future of retail.

Leon and Garry talk about the mixed outlook for the Australian economy. The latest NAB survey shows that business confidence has rebounded as firms shook off the effects of the floods and Cyclone Yasi. Australia’s unemployment remains steady at 5% and the number of jobs ads is rising. But consumer confidence looks shaky, and commentators put that down to the proposed carbon tax. The number of owner occupier home loans has also slipped and the outlook is grim for retail following the summer’s natural disasters.

The talk with the Premier Ted Baillieu is also available through iTunes as a video.

Garry and Leon talk with Victoria's Premier, Ted Baillieu, about his style of government, and the challenges it faces, not least the clean=up of the Victorian floods, the cut in GST funding from the Federal Government, and the delay to the regional rail project, issues he describes as "black holes" left by the Bracks/Brumby administration.

RMIT economist Jonathan Boymal talks about falling housing starts and lending finance. He also looks at the impact of Japan on Australia.

Leon and Garry talk about the impact of the triple whammy in Japan – earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis – leaving global equity and insurance markets reeling, wiping tens of billions off exchanges worldwide. Share prices in Japan have fallen nearly 20% and are lower across the region. The impact is likely to affect trade with Australia, at least in the short term. The biggest impact in Australia has been on uranium producers, with their shares plummeting. Shares in the insurance sector are vulnerable too, with QBE confirming it has an exposure in Japan.

Garry and Leon speak with Anna Maria Lapetina, chief executive of Ernest Hillier Chocolates.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the impact of the carbon tax on the economy.

Garry and Leon talk about how soaring oil prices caused by the Libyan crisis is creating problems in Australia with Virgin Blue now facing a loss, Qantas raising domestic airfares and Caltex saying its refiner margins are shrinking. The World Bank says the slowdown in Japan following the earthquake is temporary but Moodys says Japan faces a recession. Still, investors have shrugged off these “black swan” events. They are focusing on growth and markets are booming. Treasurer Wayne Swan is softening us up for a tough Budget to help pay for the rebuilding after the Queensland floods.

Hear from some of the world’s experts in social entrepreneurship, including Alastair Wilson, CEO of the School of Social Entrepreneurs UK, and Benny Callaghan, CEO of the School of Social Entrepreneurs Australia, facilitated by Jan Owen, CEO at The Foundation for Young Australians (FYA).

Garry and Leon talk to Billy Tucker, CEO of group buying website Cudo.com

RMIT economist Jonathan Boymal talks about the latest ABS figures on retail spending, building approvals and job vacancies.

Garry and Leon talk about the soaring Australian dollar. It’s in record territory against the greenback and is tipped to hit $1.10 by year’s end. Prime Minister Julia Gillard a review into the formula for the GST and the mining states are expected to be the big winners. Treasury has warned that the Japanese earthquake and tsunami will hit Australia's export industry, as new figures show Japan's manufacturing industry has slumped. Most older Australians are worried about their approaching retirements and expect they will have to keep working., according to a new survey.

Leon and Garry talk to Scott Kilmartin, founder of Haul, a Melbourne company that makes and distributes bags and carry cases manufactued from recycled material.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the latest jobless figures, the decision to reject the Singapore Exchange bid for the ASX and the soaring Australian dollar.

Garry and Leon talk about how home owners are spared higher mortgage payments with the RBA keeping interest rates on hold. But rising fruit and vegetable and fuel prices are pushing inflation up. At the same time, business expectations continue to decline with weak consumer spending and rising fuel prices. Home loans have fallen to their lowest level in 14 years and construction activity is driven to a two year low.

Leon and Garry talk to Freddy Sharpe, CEO of carbon management company Carbon Friendly.

RMIT economist Alberto Posso talks about the latest ABS stats on indigenous health and welfare and their implications for education and economic development.

Leon and Garry talk about how Australian Climate Change Minister Greg Combet has announced that more than 50 percent of the revenue raised by placing a price on carbon will be used to assist households. The Gillard government is on a collision course with the Greens over carbon tax assistance for big polluters, with the minor party angered at Labor's enthusiastic embrace of the abandoned 2009 compensation package and its focus on trying to please big business.

Garry and Leon talk to Daniel Feiler of eBay Australia about online retail and shopping trends.

RMIT economist Jonathan Boymal talks about the impact of a carbon price on the economy.

Garry and Leon talk about how Standard & Poor's has put the US credit rating on a negative watch, meaning there is a substantial possibility the country could lose its AAA credit rating over the next couple of years if it does not rein in its mountainous deficits and debt. The news has hit the Australian share market and sent the Australian dollar soaring. Australia's export prices rebounded last quarter, courtesy of voracious Asian demand for the country's commodity riches, lifting the terms of trade to near historic heights and fuelling a boom in mining investment.

Leon and Garry talk to Giam Swiegers, chief executive officer of Deloitte in Australia. He has led the firm through a period of spectacular growth and cultural change. He has introduced many exciting initiatives at Deloitte, from social networking to an “inspiring women” initiative at the firm which has received lots of acclaim.

Leon talks to Giam Swiegers, chief executive officer of Deloitte in Australia. He has led the firm through a period of spectacular growth and cultural change. He has introduced many exciting initiatives at Deloitte, from social networking to an “inspiring women” initiative at the firm which has received lots of acclaim.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the latest inflation figures and the work that needs to be done at the forthcoming Tax Summit.

Garry and Leon talk about the prospect of the next American president being the last to preside over the world's largest economy, as the International Monetary Fund predicts China will surpass the US in 2016. All this coincided with Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s trip to China. She has met Premier Wen Jiabao for talks about trade and the regional political outlook. She is there to see a deal where iron ore miner Gindalbie Metals secures additional funding from China to develop its Karara Project in Western Australia.

Garry and Leon talk to Frank Farrall, director of Online Business at Deloitte Consulting.

Garry and Leon look at the Federal Budget. In the lead up to the Budget, Treasury has warned the government of the danger of high inflation as the resources boom powers a return to high growth over the next two years. The federal budget is expected to help hundreds of thousands of families with teenagers by delivering Julia Gillard's election promise to increase the maximum family tax benefit for 16 to 19-year-olds by up to $4200 per child per year.

Garry and Leon talk to RMIT economist Alberto Posso about the Senate review on banking and statistics on the migrant labor force.

Economist Saul Eslake, program director at the Grattan Institute, talks about the Federal Budget and its impact on inflationary pressures.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the Budget and the latest unemployment figures.

Leon and Garry talk about the European crisis. Then to the first budget of the Gillard government which is not as savage as threatened, but if its economic forecasts are right it will get the government's balance sheet back into the black on schedule in 2012-13 anyway. The first Gillard government budget promises sweeping welfare reform, freezes family benefits for the wealthy and increases spending on mental health, while promising to be back in the black with a $3.5 billion surplus in 2012-13 and positions Australia to ride a massive new mining boom.

Garry and Leon talk to Phil Smith, CEO of Fletcher Jones, about The Skeleton Project.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the Australian banks getting downgraded and impact of cost of living increases rising above inflation.

Garry and Leon talk about the big news of the week that Australia’s four largest banks had their credit rating cut one notch to Aa2 by Moody’s Investors Service due to their reliance on overseas debt markets. Most Australians face a faster cost of living rise than the official rate of 3.3 per cent. The increase facing working families is 4.9 per cent, the increase facing age pension households is 4.1 per cent, and the increase facing Australians on welfare is 5.1 per cent.

Leon talks to Mark Birrell, Chairman of Infrastructure Partnerships Australia.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the increase in capital expenditure, the mining boom and the employment prospects and participation rate of migrants.

Leon and Garry talk about the prospect of French finance minister Christine Largarde taking the top job at the IMF, the crisis in Europe with Greece struggling with restructuring, turning it into a political problem and China's ratings agency, Dagong, downgrading Britain from AAA to AA+. Meanwhile in Australia, banks have been hammered by an investor sell off as European debt concerns and Chinese data spooked investors. Goldman Sachs has downgraded its investment view on Australia’s banking sector.

Garry and Leon talk to Mark Davidson, Chief Winemaker at Tamburlaine Organic Wines in the Hunter Valley.

RMIT economist Alberto Posso talks about industrial dispute figures, how Australia ranks as a place to business and looks at the currency’s impact on trade figures.

Garry and Leon talk about Greece and whether the Euro will survive, falling house prices in Britain and the growing debate about executive pay in the UK. In Australia, the economy has suffered its biggest quarterly contraction since the recession of the early 1990s. National gross domestic product (GDP) fell a steep 1.2 per cent in the March quarter, largely as a result of the flood impact on Queensland coal exports. Export volumes collapse 8.7 per cent in the first quarter, which will subtract a whopping 2.4 per cent from growth, stalling the economy.

Garry talks to Jim Valle & Ed Manigold of Connecting Point, a Melbourne business that provides IT solutions for Education, Corporate, Government, and Pro Video.

RMIT economist Jonathan Boymal talks about the latest labour force figures and the RBA decision to keep interest rates on hold.

Garry and Leon talk about the Euro, UK house prices and executive pay. In Australia, home owners are spared a June interest rate increase, for now. Australian retailers face their worst financial year in two decades. Melbourne’s first Zara store opens. New home loans rise by 4.8 per cent in April. Housing affordability has increased over the past year thanks to sizeable falls in property prices and wages growth, but the proportion of first home buyers falls to a 17 year low. Mineral exploration spending jumps in the March quarter. The unemployment rate remains steady at 4.9 per cent.

Tim Lusk heads Meridian Energy Ltd, a state-owned enterprise that is New Zealand’s largest electricity provider and one that derives all of its energy from renewable sources. This is mainly hydro but, increasingly, wind and solar are taking up some of the load. New Zealand currently produces 74 per cent of its energy from renewable sources – hydro, geo-thermal, wind and solar – and plans to increase that percentage to more than 90 per cent by 2025.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson analyses the Productivity Commission report on the Gillard Government’s carbon tax and looks at the coal industry.

Garry and Leon talk about signs of recovery in the British economy, the Bank of England close to finally raising interest rates, the prospect of another downgrade of Greece, Prada and the rise of China, a crack down on debt manager companies in the UK and energy prices with the gouging of consumers. In Australia, billions are wiped off the Australian sharemarket because of worries about Greece and the US economy. Over 1,000 people lose their jobs as 140 outlets in the Colorado clothing group close.

Andy Barnes is director of technology at Bryanston School, one of England’s leading public schools, which means it is a private school and one with tuition fees that would make the eyes of most people water. It is superbly equipped but it also works with government schools around it to extend the technology it uses in learning. Andy speaks of the importance of digital technology in today’s education, of the changed role of teachers, and the utility of devices such as iPads.

RMIT economist Alberto Posso talks about the future of manufacturing in Australia.

Leon and Garry talking about Telstra and NBN Co signing the $11 billion NBN agreement. The new ACCC chair, Rod Sims, warns that the NBN is a monopoly. Economists say an interest rate rise may be just six weeks away but the RBA says weak economic data took pressure off it to raise rates. The Melbourne Institute Household Financial Conditions Index plummets 24.3 per cent in June to 25.2, its lowest level in 10 years. The latest Dun & Bradstreet Corporate Health Watch shows that more than 145,000 businesses suffered a risk downgrade in the March quarter 2011.

Leon talks to Pie Face founder Wayne Homschek about his fast food franchise and plans to float it on the stock market.

Garry and Leon talk to RMIT economist Jonathon Boymal about job vacancy statistics.

Leon and Garry discuss how the Royal Australian Mint has told the Government that the five-cent coin is costly and wants it phased out. The Bank for International Settlements ranks Australian banks as the world’s most profitable but warns that could change. The Reserve Bank plays down risks facing Australian banks from their reliance on overseas funding, saying it could step in if credit markets seize up. Australian home values fall 2.7 per cent in 2011.

Professor Ian Ramsay, director of the Centre for Corporate Law and Securities Regulation, is one of the leading experts on corporate law in Australia. He speaks to Garry and Leon about the great significance of the recent court judgment finding guilty eight current and former directors of shopping centre operator, Centro. They were found to have breached their corporate duties by approving documents that failed to properly disclose about $2 billion in liabilities.

RMIT economist Alberto Posso talks about labour and trade data.

Leon and Garry discuss how interest rates have been left on hold at 4.75% for the eighth straight month. Australians will learn how the proposed carbon tax will hit their back pockets when the federal government unveils its policy on pricing pollution on Sunday. Prime Minister Julia Gillard will promise that seven out of 10 families will face no added financial burden from the carbon tax, the tax will not apply to petrol for individual drivers, it’s likely to be $23 a tonne and Gillard has halved the number of companies needing to pay the tax from 1,000 to about 500.

Garry and Leon talk with Mark Koronczyk, founder and CEO of successful food outlet Lord Of The Fries.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the impact of the carbon tax on the economy.

Garry and Leon talk about the carbon price scheme, with a carbon tax of $23 a tonne getting placed on 500 of Australia’s worst polluters. The scheme hands out over $15 billion in compensation to households to help offset the cost of living impact of the changes. The government will spend $9.2 billion over the first three years of the scheme to safeguard heavy polluting industries like steel and aluminium production. Steelmakers, including Australia's largest steelmakers BlueScope and OneSteel Ltd, will receive 94.5 per cent of free permits and $300 million in extra grants.

Garry and Leon talk with Evan Thornley, who began his business life with McKinsey and Company and who, with his wife Tracey Ellery, founded LookSmart, one of the world’s first online marketing businesses, later sold to Readers’ Digest. He was formerly and briefly a member of the Bracks Government in Victoria, resigned and became CEO of Better Place, a company founded in Israel that is in the process of launching in Australia the infrastructure (i.e.

RMIT economist Jonathan Boymal talks about the latest car sales stats and building figures.

Garry and Leon talk about how Jetstar plans to bigger than its parent company Qantas. Qantas says its long-haul pilots will begin industrial action. Westpac predicts the Reserve Bank will move to cut interest rates by the end of the year. Minutes from the most recent RBA board meeting suggest the RBA is in no hurry to raise rates. A new survey suggests more people accept that interest rates will remain steady for the rest of 2011.

Abigail Forsyth is the co-founder and CEO of KeepCup, a Melbourne startup that has so far sold 800,000 of its “you-keep-it” plastic coffee mugs, and is busily expanding into overseas markets. Ms Forsyth, most of three young children, and her brother, started in business with BlueBag, a highly successful chain of CBD sandwich shops. That was sold about a year ago and KeepCup founded. She talks about the challenges of the business and her decision to keep all design and manufacturing in Australia, giving her several advantages over exporting the manufacturing to China at no real cost penalty.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the latest inflation figures and the prospect of Australia being hit with stagflation.

Leon and Garry talk about consumer prices rising more than expected in the three months to June, signaling an interest rate hike and sending the Australian dollar to a28 year high. A new study shows Australia’s house prices have become unaffordable. The Reserve Bank of Australia tells bank investors and the executives that the double-digit growth days are over. The Reserve Bank governor has again warned retailers and lenders the consumption boom of the mid-90s to mid-2000s was a one-off but adds consumers will return.

Garry and Leon talk to Matt Butterworth, founder of successful Australian website easyweddings.com

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about the US debt ceiling deal, the RBA’s decision on interest rates and which way it will go, trade figures and what retailers have to do to survive.

Leon and Garry talk about how it’s been a bad week for investors with the Australian sharemarket diving to its lowest point in almost a year and the Australian dollar taking a battering over concerns about a possible United States recession and figures showing retail spending in Australia at a standstill. The United States steps back from the brink of default. Fears of a recession in the US drives gold up to $1,666.30 an ounce.

Garry talks to Naomi Simson, founder and CEO of the successful internet start up Red Balloon.

RMIT economist Sinclair Davidson talks about market volatility, unemployment, interest rates and running a business in uncertain times.

Leon and Garry talk about the share market’s volatility, both here and around the world. Future Fund chairman David Murray says it will be volatile for the next 20 years. Volatile times too for the Australian dollar. The Federal Government faces an uphill battle to bring the budget back into surplus. Superannuation managers still have more than half of their funds in shares. The NAB business survey shows trading conditions have deteriorated. Australia's unemployment rate surges to an eight-month high of 5.1 per cent and job advertisements decline 0.7 per cent in July.

Leon and Garry talk to David Blackmore who is the Managing Director and founder of Blackmore Wagyu Beef, a producer of 100 per cent premium Japanese Wagyu beef for international and domestic markets.

RMIT economist Jonathan Boymal talks about motor vehicle sales, wages growth and the cost of living index.

Leon and Garry discuss how the high Australian dollar and a slowdown have claimed their first mass casualties, with Qantas, GWA, Westpac, OneSteel and Thiess Egremont announcing job cuts. Wages rise less in the June quarter than the market expects and RBA minutes show the RBA will probably keep interest rates on hold. Women's pay rises by less than half as high as for male workers . Retiring Reserve Bank board member Warwick McKibbin says the RBA board should not have a majority of business leaders.

The electric car is on the ascendant as oil prices rise and global concerns over pollution increase. Dr Laurie Sparke, formerly head of Holden’s innovative advanced engineering division and now technical director of EDay Life, a manufacturer of small all-electric cars, talks about his project together with Vikash Rugoobor, who heads Curve Tomorrow, the Melbourne company that built the iPad application that controls this innovative car. Dr Sparke is also a professor in the engineering faculty at RMIT University.

RMIT econiomist Alberto Posso talks about why the carbon tax will not work.

Leon and Garry discuss how BlueScope Steel is axing at least 1,000 jobs as it announces a $1.054 billion loss. OneSteel is expanding. Meanwhile, BlueScope Steel executives pocket $3 million worth of bonuses. Leighton chairman David Mortimer and chief executive David Stewart are forced out. International companies planning to invest in Australia will include local firms under new measures. Treasury boss Martin Parkinson warns financial turmoil will plague the world for years. Weak construction figures suggest low economic growth.